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Cognitive Science Perspectives On Learning And Instructional Quality

  • Wim H. Gijselaers
  • Geert Woltjer
Part of the Educational Innovation in Economics and Business book series (EIEB, volume 2)

Abstract

If the aim of business education is to teach students how to use their knowledge to solve real world business problems, then how should teaching occur? This question has gained relevancy due to ongoing criticisms on the quality of business education (e.g. Milter & Stinson, 1995). It has been criticised for its lack of practice orientation and the use of obsolete instructional practices that do not seem to ensure efficient and effective teaching. But if we want to work towards innovation and reform in business education, what kinds of instruments are available to realise improvement? Is it simply a matter of reorganising and reselecting curriculum contents adapted to the needs of corporations, or are new ways of teaching required that enable business educators to prepare students in a different way for the business world? However, even if business educators are committed to the goal of educating students to become effective problem-solvers, then what kind of learning theories tell us how to accomplish this goal?

Key words

Business education Problem solving Novices Experts 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wim H. Gijselaers
    • 1
  • Geert Woltjer
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Maastrichtthe Netherlands

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