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How Far Can We Control the Heterogeneity of Wood and Wood Based Materials Through Design ?

  • P. Castera
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Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASHT, volume 46)

Abstract

Wood is usually considered apart from other materials by engineers and designers, related more to nature than to artifice, to tradition than to modernism. Mechanical performances of wood, especially in bending, are well known, and have been utilised in load bearing structures from historic times. To be more precise some woods are known for their mechanical performances, and actually there is a tremendous variability of the properties of commercialised woods, the origin of which lies in the diversity of species, but also in the heterogeneity of production conditions. One can take advantage of this diversity, considering that different species have different mechanical properties that can be utilised for different purposes, but this requires a specific culture of “ doing with wood ”.

Keywords

Wood Property Orient Strand Board Medium Density Fibreboard Wood Base Material Weibull Stress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Castera
    • 1
  1. 1.LRBB(CNRS/INRA/Université Bordeaux 1)CestasFrance

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