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Resistance to Glyphosate in a Population of Lolium Rigidum

  • T. R. Hawkes
  • D. F. Lorraine-Collwill
  • P. H. Williams
  • S. A. J. Warner
  • P. B. Sutton
  • S. B. Powles
  • C. Preston
Part of the Current Plant Science and Biotechnology in Agriculture book series (PSBA, volume 36)

Abstract

Lolium rigidum is a grass weed which is widely established throughout the cropping regions of Southern Australia. It has displayed a marked propensity to evolve resistance to herbicides and, indeed, there now exist some populations which have become resistant to most of the major herbicide chemistries used in Australia (Preston et al 1996; Powles et al 1997). Until recently glyphosate has seemed relatively immune to this problem. However, it now seems that at least two populations of lolium rigidum have evolved resistance in response to the repeated use of glyphosate over many years (Pratley et al 1996; Powles et al 1998). In the case of the population described by Powles et al, glyphosate failed to control a population of lolium rigidum in an orchard in Orange, NSW, Australia following 15 years of previously successful use. Resistance was confirmed in pot dose experiments and survivors of a treatment of 450 g ai ha−1 were further intercrossed to yield a population which consistently exhibited 7–11s fold resistance when compared to the survival rates of a standard susceptible population. Here we describe the results of a study aimed to elucidate the mechanism of this recently evolved resistance.

Keywords

Susceptible Plant Grass Weed Benzenesulfonyl Fluoride Diclofop Methyl Waite Campus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. R. Hawkes
    • 1
  • D. F. Lorraine-Collwill
    • 2
  • P. H. Williams
    • 1
  • S. A. J. Warner
    • 1
  • P. B. Sutton
    • 1
  • S. B. Powles
    • 3
    • 4
  • C. Preston
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Dept. of InventionZeneca AgrochemicalsBracknell, Berks.UK
  2. 2.Dept. of Crop Protection, Waite CampusUniversity of AdelaideGlen OsmondAustralia
  3. 3.Cooperative Research Centre for Weed Mangagement Systems, Waite CampusUniversity of AdelaideGlen OsmondAustralia
  4. 4.Western Weeds Initiative, Faculty of AgricultureUniversity of Western AustraliaNedlandsAustralia

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