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Early Development and the Risk for Neurobehavioural Disorder

New Approaches Exemplified by the “Visual Attention/ADHD” Issue
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Abstract

During the last decades insight in the factors, which affect the early risk for neuro-behavioural deviance has substantially grown, not the least due to the development of refined models for the conceptualisation of brain-behaviour relationships from the earliest phases of development onwards. In parallel, procedures have been developed, which allow for the observation and measurement of brain activity in various states of the organism and at various levels of organisation. Nowadays, considerable progress is being made in the ability to chart brain processes, states and activities, like speaking and reading at the same time. This implies an enormous gain in explanatory power with respect to early risk for neurobehavioural deviance as compared to some decades ago. A better understanding of brain-behaviour relationships in early ontogeny is a prerequisite for the improvement of early diagnosis and our possibilities for prevention and treatment. In this light, the “state of the art” in the study of early risk for neurobehavioural deviance will be discussed in this chapter.

Keywords

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Congenital Hypothyroidism Early Risk Covert Attention Optimality Score 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1999

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