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Heliospheric Extent of the Coronal Phenomena

  • G. Mariş
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science Series book series (ASIC, volume 558)

Abstract

The solar photosphere has been watched regularly since 1750; the patrol of the chromosphere has been made daily for the last 50 years. The solar corona, observed at the ground only during total solar eclipses a long time ago, has been observed with special coronographs since the ‘30s. However, the last three decades, beginning with OSO 7 and Skylab space missions, contributed enormously to our present knowledge of the solar corona. Today the corona is watched both from ground and from space. The solar space missions Yohkoh and SOHO are registering coronal phenomena in the X and UV radiations in the ecliptic plane, while Ulysses is crossing over the polar solar region (at an angle of about 87° with the ecliptic plan).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Mariş
    • 1
  1. 1.Astronomical Institute of the Romanian AcademyBucharest 28Romania

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