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Tree allelopathy in agroforestry

  • M. Paramathma
  • J. A. Amal
  • M. Rajkumar
Chapter

Abstract

Introduction of trees in agro-ecosystems have helped us to withstand the present.pace of deforestation. The farmers have planted trees in good agricultural lands and have grown crops in association with trees. In these agroforestry systems, the yields of crops may be reduced due to competition and allelopathic interactions with trees. Allelopathic studies have revealed that ideal tree-crop combinations with mutual stimulatory effects optimise the yields of both components. The paper describes the stimulatory and inhibitory interactions of few agroforestry trees.

Key words

Agroforestry allelochemicals allelopathy crops trees 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Paramathma
    • 1
  • J. A. Amal
    • 1
  • M. Rajkumar
    • 1
  1. 1.Forest College and Research InstituteTamil Nadu Agricultural UniversityMettupalayamIndia

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