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Copper and postmenopausal osteoporosis

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Abstract

Osteoporosis is defined as a disease characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue leading to enhanced bone fragility and consequent risk of fracture [1]. It is the most common metabolic bone disease of postmenopausal women in the Western world. Like other diseases of unknown causation, the aetiology of osteoporosis is considered to be multifactorial. Age, genetic and reproductive history, body weight and various life-style factors, including diet, have been associated with the disease and can predict risk [2]. The disease may also arise as a consequence of other diseases, e.g. Cushing’s syndrome, hypogonadism and hyperparathyroidism, or treatment, e.g. corticosteroids. Peak bone mass is achieved by the fourth decade of life and thereafter there is a slow decrease in both sexes. Rate of bone loss in women, however, is markedly increased around the menopause, and hormone replacement therapy is the most effective way of slowing down this loss [3].

Keywords

  • Bone Loss
  • Trabecular Bone
  • Postmenopausal Osteoporosis
  • Peak Bone Mass
  • Trace Mineral

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Strain, J.J. (1998). Copper and postmenopausal osteoporosis. In: Rainsford, K.D., Milanino, R., Sorenson, J.R.J., Velo, G.P. (eds) Copper and Zinc in Inflammatory and Degenerative Diseases. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-3963-2_12

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-3963-2_12

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Dordrecht

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