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Copper and zinc compounds and cell surface interactions

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Abstract

The essential requirement of copper and zinc for normal bone and cartilage development, and the efficacy of copper and zinc compounds as anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic agents have been well established, based primarily on a wealth of evidence from studies of dietary copper and zinc deficiency and supplementation in laboratory animals and man [1–5]. Surprisingly few studies have, however, focused on the mechanisms of action of copper and zinc at the molecular level. The aim of this brief review is to present current knowledge of the effects of copper and zinc at the cell surface, and to discuss mechanisms whereby modification of cellular interactions by these trace metals may play a role in inflammatory and degenerative diseases.

Keywords

  • Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell
  • Zinc Deficiency
  • Copper Deficiency
  • Zinc Sulphate
  • Dietary Copper

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Davies, M.E., Pasqualicchio, M. (1998). Copper and zinc compounds and cell surface interactions. In: Rainsford, K.D., Milanino, R., Sorenson, J.R.J., Velo, G.P. (eds) Copper and Zinc in Inflammatory and Degenerative Diseases. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-3963-2_11

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-3963-2_11

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Dordrecht

  • Print ISBN: 978-94-010-5757-8

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