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Keywords

Renal Insufficiency Dialysis Patient Parent Drug Chemical Formula Plasma Protein Binding 
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References

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Main references

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Main references

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Renal damage:

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  2. Carmichael J, Shankel SW: Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on prostaglandins and renal function. Am J Med 78:992, 1985PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Clive DM, Stoff JS: Renal syndromes associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. N Engl J Med 310:563, 1984PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Duggin GG: Mechanisms in the development of analgesic nephropathy. Kidney Int 18:553, 1980PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Dunn MJ: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and renal function. Annu Rev Med 35:411, 1984PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Hart D, Lifschitz MD: Renal physiology of the prostaglandins and the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents on the kidney. Am J Nephrol 7:408, 1987PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Henrich WL: Nephrotoxicity of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. Am J Kidney Dis 2:478, 1982Google Scholar
  8. Orme ML’E: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the kidney. Br Med J 292:1521, 1986CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Reeves WB, Foley RJ, Weinman EJ: Renal dysfunction from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Arch Intern Med 144:1943, 1984PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Simon LS, Mills JA: Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (First of two parts). N Engl J Med 302:1179, 1980PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Simon LS, Mills JA: Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (Second of two parts). N Engl J Med 302:1237, 1980PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Torres VE: Present and future of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in nephrology. Mayo Clin Proc 57:389, 1982PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Toto RD, Anderson SA, Brown-Cartwright D, Kokko JP, Brater DG: Effects of acute and chronic dosing of NSAIDs in patients with renal insufficiency. Kidney Int 30:760, 1986PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Wegmüller E: Nicht-steroidale Antirheumatika und Nephrotoxi-zität. Dtsch Med Wochenschr 110:469, 1985PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Main references General:

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Günter Seyffart
    • 1
  1. 1.Dialysis CenterBad HomburgGermany

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