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Keywords

Renal Insufficiency Dialysis Patient Chemical Formula Plasma Protein Binding Common Side Effect 
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References

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Renal damage:

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  3. Clive DM, Stoff JS: Renal syndromes associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. N Engl J Med 310:563, 1984PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  5. Dunn MJ: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and renal function. Annu Rev Med 35:411, 1984PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Hart D, Lifschitz MD: Renal physiology of the prostaglandins and the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents on the kidney. Am J Nephrol 7:408, 1987PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  8. Orme ML’E: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the kidney. Br Med J 292:1521, 1986CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Reeves WB, Foley RJ, Weinman EJ: Renal dysfunction from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Arch Intern Med 144:1943, 1984PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  14. Wegmüller E: Nicht-steroidale Antirheumatika und Nephrotoxi-zität. Dtsch Med Wochenschr 110:469, 1985PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Günter Seyffart
    • 1
  1. 1.Dialysis CenterBad HomburgGermany

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