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Hybridoma Culture in the Hollow-Fiber System -The Effects of Growth Factors-

  • Takeshi Omasa
  • Masaki Kobayashi
  • Toshio Nishikawa
  • Suteaki Shioya
  • Ken-ichi Suga
  • Syo-ichi Uemura
  • Yoshio Imamura

Abstract

Based on the data from 60 days’ continuous cultivation, the effects of high molecular weight growth factors on antibody production were analyzed quantitatively. Transferrin had no effect on antibody production, while BSA enhanced the antibody production rate significantly. The antibody production rate increased 4 times and 14 times in the case of the feeding BSA of 2 g/ℓ and 5g/ℓ into the EC space (space connected to the outer part of the hollow fibers) respectively compared with the data without addition of BSA. Five g/ℓ of BSA addition into the IC space (space connected to the inner part of the hollow fibers) resulted in 2.5 times increase of this production rate compared with no addition of BSA. The antibody production rate in the hollow-fiber system was increased 3 times by BSA feeding as much as that in the perfusion culture system.

Keywords

Bovine Serum Albumin Hollow Fiber Perfusion Culture Spinner Flask Antibody Production Rate 
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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takeshi Omasa
    • 1
  • Masaki Kobayashi
    • 1
  • Toshio Nishikawa
    • 1
  • Suteaki Shioya
    • 1
  • Ken-ichi Suga
    • 1
  • Syo-ichi Uemura
    • 2
  • Yoshio Imamura
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Fermentation Technology, Faculty of EngineeringOsaka UniversitySuita-shi, OsakaJapan
  2. 2.Toyobo Co. LtdOtsu-shi, ShigaJapan

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