Advertisement

Phenomenology and Teleology: Husserl and Fichte

  • Theresa Pentzopoulou Valalas
Part of the Analecta Husserliana book series (ANHU, volume 34)

Abstract

The approach to phenomenology today is liable to a double prejudice. The first would be that of overlooking the originality of a thought which appeared to be quite new at its time, but which having been ever since adopted and integrated in philosophical thinking could be easily considered to be of poor interest today. This would be the prejudice of evidence. Thus, for instance, bringing up intentionality would be said to be going back to the past. By contrast, the second prejudice could be that of insisting too heavily on the special and particular character of a philosophical thought by preciously keeping it apart from other philosophies in order to preserve its very specific difference. In that case, we would have the prejudice of specificity. In both cases, phenomenology would suffer.

Keywords

Transcendental Phenomenology Intentional Experience German Idealist Transcendental Logic Intellectual Intuition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    There is, as a matter of fact, written evidence that Husserl was aware of the importance of Fichte’s presence in the philosophical life in Germany. It is, however, Fichte’s political and ethical writings that mostly attracted his attention. Quite a number of his manuscripts refer to Fichte (Ms. trans. B IV 9, FI 22, MS. or A VI 10). For a more detailed account of them, see Rudolf Bohm’s article “Husserl und der klassische Idealismus” in Vom Gesichtspunkt der Phänomenologie (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1968), pp. 18–71. (First published in French in Revue Philosophique de Louvain, 57, 1959, pp. 351–396. See also in Iso Kern, Husserl und Kant, ch. 3 “Die Periode der Genetischen Phänomenologie” (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1964), pp. 34ff.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Husserl seems to have rejected the whole idea of the Wissenschaftslehre on the grounds of its highly abstract character and language. He thinks that it leaves out experience. “Die Wissenschaftslehre, als Wissenschaft, fragt schlechterdings nicht nach der Erfahrung und nimmt auf sie schechthin keine Rüchsicht. Sie musste wahr sein, wenn es auch gar keine Erfahrung geben konnte.” Erste Philosophie, I, Beilage XXII (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1956), p. 411.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    “Die Wissenschaftslehre, als Wissenschaft, fragt schlechterdings nicht nach der Erfahrung und nimmt auf sie schechthin keine Rüchsicht. Sie musste wahr sein, wenn es auch gar keine Erfahrung geben konnte.” Erste Philosophie, I, Beilage XVIII, p. 376 where he insists on the “mythical” character of Fichte’s philosophy which he holds to be a powerful construct of immanent teleology. Husserl’s knowledge of the Wissenschaftslehre was probably limited to the two Introductions. See Iso Kern, Husserl und Kant, ch. 3 “Die Periode der Genetischen Phänomenologie” (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1964), p. 36, note 5.Google Scholar
  4. 6.
    Husserl took good care to separate Fichte as a moralist from Fichte as a theoretician. In November, 1917, he gave three conferences — which he repeated in January, 1918 — to young soldiers on leave from the front. His Fichte-Vorträge were throughout inspired by Fichte’s ethical ideas concerning man’s destiny and Ideals. He spoke highly of Fichte as the philosopher of the war for freedom (“Philosoph der Befreiungskriege”) and as a religious and ethical reformer. In his conferences, he quoted from the following works: “Die Bestimmung des Menschen, Erlanger Vorlesungen über das Wesen des Gelehrten, Die Grundlage des gegenwärtigen Zeitalters, Anweisungen zum seligen Leben, Reden an die Deutsche Nation, Fünf Berliner Vorlesungen über die Bestimmung des Gelehrten.” Cf. Iso Kern, Husserl und Kant, ch. 3 “Die Periode der Genetischen Phänomenologie” (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1964), p. 36, note 5.Google Scholar
  5. 7.
    Husserl blames the German idealists for having transformed formal concepts into real existing things. “… Aus formalen Begriffen wird das Empirische konstruiert, und ganz allgemein, formale Begriffe werden zu realen Existenzen, werden als reale Wesen und Krafte gedacht.” See Erste Philosophie I, Beilage XXII, Husserliana VII, 1956, p. 411. Cf. Erste Philosophie I, Beilage XXII, Husserliana VII, 1956, p. 407 where the language used by the German idealists is characterized as Kaudelwelsch.Google Scholar
  6. 9.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 205.Google Scholar
  7. 10.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 205.Google Scholar
  8. 11.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 205.Google Scholar
  9. 13.
    In a text as early as 1794 on the concept of the Theory of Science, Fichte writes: “Philosophy is a science; on this point all descriptions of philosophy agree as much as they are divided in determining the object of this science.” And he pursues wondering whether the reason for this diversity of opinions is not due to the fact that the concept of “science” has not as yet been sufficiently analyzed. In the same year, in his Preface to the Grundlage der gesamten Wissenschaftslehre he stresses the point: “I believed and I believe that I have discovered the way in which philosophy itself must raise to the rank of an evident science.” “Vorrede,” Wissenschaftslehre I 86 in Fichte’s Werke, Auswahl in 6 Bänden, ed. F. Medicus (Leipzig: 1922), I Bd. Schriften von 1792–1795. For Husserl we need not insist on the importance of his Logos article “Philosophie als strenge Wissenschaft.” But there Husserl is somehow unjust towards Fichte when he writes that up to then there had been no scientific elaboration of the concept of philosophy as rigorous science. He realizes, however, that he cannot underestimate German idealists on the whole and he goes on admitting their contribution: “I do not say that philosophy is an imperfect science. I simply say that it is not as yet a science, that it has not as yet made its commencement as a science. …” He acknowledges, though, changes “that have been decisive for the progress of philosophy” through Plato, Socrates, Descartes. They have permitted us to establish philosophy on a new basis and Kant and Fichte have contributed to this but not quite in the appropriate way because romantic philosophy led to either a weakening or a falsification of a rigorous philosophical science. See Q. Lauer, La philosophie comme science rigoureuse (PUF), pp. 55–56.Google Scholar
  10. 14.
    “Nachwort” in E. Husserl, Ideen zu einer reinen Phänomenologie und phänomenologischen Philosophie III, Die Phänomenologie und die Fundamente der Wissenschaften, Husserliana V (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1952), p. 151.Google Scholar
  11. 15.
    E. Husserl, Ideen zu einer reinen Phänomenologie und phänomenologische Philosophie I. Allgemeine Einführung in die reine Phänomenologie (The Hague: Nijhoff, 1950), (Husserliana III), p. 119.Google Scholar
  12. 16.
    J. G. Fichte, Transzendentale Logik, ed. F. Medicus (Leipzig: 1922), 6ter Band, p. 143 (q IX 127).Google Scholar
  13. 17.
    J. G. Fichte, Transzendentale Logik, ed. F. Medicus (Leipzig: 1922), 6ter Band, p.26.Google Scholar
  14. 18.
    E. Husserl, Einleitung in die Logik und Erkenntnistheorie, Husserliana XXIV (The Hague: Nijhoff, 1984), p. 200. For Husserl it is not possible to proceed by transcendental substructions and the hypothesis of the “self-confidence” of reason (Selbstvertrauen der Vernunft). He insists on calling the German idealists’ concept of “reason” a “mythical” concept. See E. Husserl, Einleitung in die Logik und Erkenntnistheorie, Husserliana XXIV (The Hague: Nijhoff, 1984), p. 20.Google Scholar
  15. 19.
    E. Husserl, Einleitung in die Logik und Erkenntnistheorie, Husserliana XXIV (The Hague: Nijhoff, 1984), p. 201.Google Scholar
  16. 20.
    See Iso Kern, Husserl und Kant, ch. 3 “Die Periode der Genetischen Phänomenologie” (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1964), p. 36, note 5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 21.
    E. Husserl, Über das Verhältnis der Logik zur Philosophie oder Transzendentale Logik (1812), ed. F. Medicus (Leipzig: 1922), 6er Band Schriften von, 1812–1813, p. 22 (=IX 124).Google Scholar
  18. 22.
    E. Husserl, Über das Verhältnis der Logik zur Philosophie oder Transzendentale Logik (1812), ed. F. Medicus (Leipzig: 1922), 6er Band Schriften von, 1812–1813, p. 22 (IX 124–125).Google Scholar
  19. 23.
    E. Husserl, Über das Verhältnis der Logik zur Philosophie oder Transzendentale Logik (1812), ed. F. Medicus (Leipzig: 1922), 6er Band Schriften von, 1812–1813, p. 32–33 (IX 134–135).Google Scholar
  20. 24.
    E. Husserl, Über das Verhältnis der Logik zur Philosophie oder Transzendentale Logik (1812), ed. F. Medicus (Leipzig: 1922), 6er Band Schriften von, 1812–1813, p. 34 (IX 136).Google Scholar
  21. 25.
    “Das gerade ist die Wurzel und das innigste Wesen des Organs zur Philosophie, das Ihnen schlechthin angemutet wird, Sinn zu haben für den Sinn, als etwas anderes, denn alles Mögliche, was genommen wird in einem Sinne.” J. G. Fichte, Über das Verhältnis der Logik zur Philosophie oder Transzendentale Logik (1812), ed. F. Medicus (Leipzig: 1922), 6er Band Schriften von, 1812–1813, p. 153 (IX 137).Google Scholar
  22. 26.
    J. G. Fichte, Über das Verhältnis der Logik zur Philosophie oder Transzendentale Logik (1812), ed. F. Medicus (Leipzig: 1922), 6er Band Schriften von, 1812–1813, pp. 168–169 (IX 152–153). “Bild setzt ein Gebildetes. Diese Beziehung nun im Bilde auf etwas ausser ihm, die da ist, wie es selbst ist, ist Anschauung, Hinschauung, also ein Leben.”Google Scholar
  23. 27.
    E. Husserl, Ideen zu einer reinen Phänomenologie und phänomenologische Philosophie I. Allgemeine Einführung in die reine Phänomenologie (The Hague: Nijhoff, 1950), (Husserliana III), English trans. by W. R. B. Gibson, pp. 257–258.Google Scholar
  24. 28.
    E. Husserl, Ideen zu einer reinen Phänomenologie und phänomenologische Philosophie I. Allgemeine Einführung in die reine Phänomenologie (The Hague: Nijhoff, 1950), (Husserliana III), 90, p. 225, English transl., pp. 263–264. Husserl’s argument here is that the idea of an “imagining consciousness” (Abbildungsbewusstsein) will lead to a regressio ad inifinitum as the series “of the image of an image” never actually ceases.Google Scholar
  25. 29.
    E. Husserl, Ideen zu einer reinen Phänomenologie und phänomenologische Philosophie I. Allgemeine Einführung in die reine Phänomenologie (The Hague: Nijhoff, 1950), Husserliana III), 129, English trans., pp. 362–362.Google Scholar
  26. 30a.
    E. Husserl, Ideen zu einer reinen Phänomenologie und phänomenologische Philosophie I. Allgemeine Einführung in die reine Phänomenologie (The Hague: Nijhoff, 1950), (Husserliana III), 129, English trans., p. 132.Google Scholar
  27. 30b.
    E. Husserl, Ideen zu einer reinen Phänomenologie und phänomenologische Philosophie I. Allgemeine Einführung in die reine Phänomenologie (The Hague: Nijhoff, 1950), (Husserliana III), 129, English trans., p. 368.Google Scholar
  28. 31.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 269.Google Scholar
  29. 32.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), Appendix XXV, p. 497.Google Scholar
  30. 33.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 497.Google Scholar
  31. 34.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 498.Google Scholar
  32. 35.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), pp. 165. Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), pp. 167.Google Scholar
  33. 36.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 169.Google Scholar
  34. 37.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 237.Google Scholar
  35. 38.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 245.Google Scholar
  36. 39.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 250.Google Scholar
  37. 40.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p.338.Google Scholar
  38. 41.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 339.Google Scholar
  39. 42.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), pp. 200–201.Google Scholar
  40. 43.
    Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 339.Google Scholar
  41. 44.
    See J. G. Fichte, Einige Vorlesungen über die Bestimmung des Gelehrten (1794). The similarity here with Husserl is striking. Fichte states clearly that the essence of man is rational. Man is above all a free, rational being. The achievement of a higher form of rationality is man’s ultimate goal and all his efforts should be directed towards this goal. But as it is man’s inner essence to aspire for rationality, this goal remains an ideal as an endless march and progression towards it achievement. But the goal is and will always be unattainable since man can never cease to be man and become God. “Es liegt im Begriff des Menschen, dass sein letztes Ziel unerreichbar, sein Weg zu demselben unendlich sein muss. Mithin ist es nicht die Bestimmung des Menschen dieses Ziel zu erreichen. Aber er kann und soll diesem Ziele immer näher kommen: und daher ist die Annäherung ins unendliche zu diesem Ziele seine wahre Bestimmung als Mensch, d.h. als vernunftiges, aber endliches, als sinnliches, aber freies Wesen.” Philosophy’s telos is to be seen as being under the scope of man’s teleology. Fichte declares openly that a philosophy that does not tend towards the realization and the achievement of the elevation of man as a rational being should not be considered very highly. “…ich alle Philosophie und Wissenschaft für nichtig halte, die nicht auf dieses Ziel ausgeht.” — in Fichte’s Werke, Ier Band, Schriften von 1792–1795, ed. F. Medicus (Leipzig: 1922), pp. 228 and 229 (VI 300–301).Google Scholar
  42. 45.
    E. Husserl, Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 346.Google Scholar
  43. 46.
    See the last paragraphs of the Vienna Conference (Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 348) which are particularly revealing.Google Scholar
  44. 47.
    E. Husserl, Vienna Conference, in Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 319.Google Scholar
  45. 48.
    E. Husserl, Vienna Conference, in Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), pp. 275f.Google Scholar
  46. 49.
    E. Husserl, Vienna Conference, in Die Krisis der Europäischen Wissenschaften und die transzendentale Phänomenologie, Husserliana VI (The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1962), p. 213.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theresa Pentzopoulou Valalas
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ThessalonikiGreece

Personalised recommendations