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Computer simulation in manufacturing systems analysis

Chapter

Abstract

Computer simulation can be considered as an experimental approach for studying certain functional properties of an organization by experimenting with an appropriate computer model rather than with the real system itself. It is basically an experimental methodology using the power of a computer to process and analyse the large amount of data involved in a problem which otherwise would be extremely difficult to handle (see, for example, Shannon, 1975; Zeigler, 1976; Poole and Szymankiewicz, 1977; Pritsker, 1979; Pritsker and Pegden, 1979; Law and Kelton 1982; Ellison and Wilson, 1984; Gottfried, 1984; Pitt, 1984; Carrie, 1988). It provides an efficient and economical — and sometimes even the only possible — way to analyse a system. Compared with direct real experimentation, the computer simulation approach has the advantages of lower cost, shorter time, greater flexibility and much smaller risk. As a result, this methodology has been extensively used in the area of manufacturing systems studies by both academic researchers and practical engineers.

Keywords

Simulation Model Expert System Manufacturing System Machine Time Machine Centre 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further reading

  1. Browne, J. and Davies, B.J. (1984), The Design and Validation of a Digital Simulation Model for Job Shop Control Decision Making’, International Journal of Production Research, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 335–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Carrie, A. (1988), Simulation of Manufacturing Systems, John Wiley.Google Scholar
  3. Ellison, D. and Wilson, J.C.T (1984), How to Write Simulations Using Microcomputers, McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  4. Ford, D, and Schroer, B. (1987), ‘An Expert Manufacturing Simulation System’, Simulation, May.Google Scholar
  5. Ketcham, M. et al., (1989), ‘Information Structures for simulation Modelling of Manufacturing Systems’, Simulation, February.Google Scholar
  6. Kiran, A. et al., (1989), ‘An Integrated Simulation Approach to Design of Flexible Manufacturing Systems’, Simulation, February.Google Scholar
  7. Law, A.M. and Kelton, W.D. (1982), Simulation Modelling and Analysis, McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  8. Pitt, M. (1984), Computer Simulation in Management Science, John Wiley.Google Scholar
  9. Wildberger, M. (1989), ‘AI and Simulation’, Simulation, July.Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© B. Wu 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Wu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Manufacturing and Engineering SystemsBrunel UniversityMiddlesexUK

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