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Fibre and Resistant Starch and Cancer

  • A. R. Leeds
Part of the Developments in Oncology book series (DION, volume 70)

Abstract

‘Dietary Fibre’ was defined in the 1970’s as ‘plant polysaccharides’ and lignin not digested by enzymes in the small intestine of man (Trowell et al., 1976). This ‘physiological’ definition is unsatisfactory for a number of reasons, and the development of several different (chemical) analytical methods for dietary fibre has drawn attention to the need for newer chemically specific terms (Marlett, 1990). ‘Non-Starch Polysaccharides’ is the term currently adopted in the United Kingdom, following the recommendation by a British Nutrition Foundation Taskforce that the term ‘Dietary Fibre’ be no longer used, at least by the scientific community (British Nutrition Foundation, 1990).

Keywords

Dietary Fibre Resistant Starch Digestible Starch Human Small Intestine Plant Polysaccharide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. R. Leeds
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NutritionKing’s College LondonLondon W8UK

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