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Historical Review of Hip Equipment

  • Charles B. Boyer

Abstract

This paper is one person’s endeavor to write a systematic account of the development of Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) equipment from the purchase of the first cold-wall HIP vessel through the first part of 1970.

Thirty-five years ago, the author, a mechanical engineer, joined Battelle’s Fuel Element Development Division at the request of Henry (Hank) Saller. Hank wanted him to devote most of his time to the design and maintenance of the Division’s equipment. It was shortly thereafter that the author accompanied Ed Hodge to one of Battelle’s warehouse facilities, where a pressure vessel had been set into a pit. Since being introduced to this vessel, the author has been directly involved in the design, development, and application of Battelle’s twelve HIP systems and has assisted most HIP suppliers and many of the HIP users with their equipment and systems.

Calling upon this varied experience, the many records and files that were maintained, and the acknowledged assistance of several experienced persons, it is hoped to present an accurate and interesting history of HIP equipment, with a philosophical explanation or accounting of their purpose.

Keywords

Fuel Element Union Carbide Corporation Battelle Memorial Institute Piston Compressor Lower Closure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Elselvier Science Publishers Ltd 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles B. Boyer
    • 1
  1. 1.Retired from Battelle/Consultant for Howmet CorporationColumbusUSA

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