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Sources of inter-individual variability in nicotine pharmacokinetics

  • S. Cholerton
  • N. W. McCracken
  • J. R. Idle

Abstract

There is a considerable degree of inter-individual variability in the toxicological, physiological and psychological responses to tobacco products. Although these responses are determined by many factors, to a certain extent the differences may be attributed to variation in the pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the major pharmacologically active component of tobacco.

Keywords

Interindividual Variability Rabbit Lung Serum Cotinine Nicotine Metabolism Stumptailed Macaque 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Cholerton
  • N. W. McCracken
  • J. R. Idle

There are no affiliations available

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