Modelling the time dependent flow over riblets in the viscous wall region

  • S. Tullis
  • A. Pollard
Part of the Fluid Mechanics and its Applications book series (FMIA, volume 19)

Abstract

The flow over riblets is examined computationally using a time dependent model of the viscous wall region. This “2 1/2 D model”, developed by Hatziavramidis and Hanratty (1979) and modified by Nikolaides (1984) and Chapman and Kuhn (1981, 1986) assumes homogeneity in the streamwise direction so that the flow is solved only in the cross-sectional plane. The flow at the upper boundary of the computational domain (y + ≃ 40) is described using a streamwise eddy model consisting of two scales, one of the streak spacing (λ + ≃ 100), which dominates vertical momentum transport, and a larger scale that accounts for the influence of large outer flow eddies.

The protrusion height concept (Bechert and Bartenwerfer, 1989) is used to define a y + = 0 location for surfaces with riblets. A control volume finite element method utilizing triangular meshes is used to exactly fit the riblet cross-sectional geometry. Results obtained using fairly large riblets compare well with the limited experimental evidence available. Observations of the transient flow suggest that the riblets interact with the near-wall streamwise vortices, weakening them by the generation of intermittent secondary vortices within the riblet valleys. The riblets also appear to limit the lateral spread of inrushes towards the wall and retain low momentum fluid in the riblet valleys effectively isolating much of the wall from such inrushes.

Keywords

Wall Shear Stress Turbulent Boundary Layer Drag Reduction Streamwise Vortex High Wall Shear Stress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Tullis
    • 1
  • A. Pollard
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringQueen’s University at KingstonCanada

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