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Is Nature Conformable to Herself?

  • Derek Gjertsen
Chapter
Part of the Archives Internationales D’Histoire Des Idées / International Archives of the History of Ideas book series (ARCH, volume 136)

Abstract

To the early scientist, nature was characterized by a number of deep divisions. For Aristotle, while terrestrial matter was composed of the four elements earth, water, air and fire, the heavenly bodies consisted of a quite different substance, the fifth element, ether. Again, terrestrial bodies moved with their natural motion, rectilinearly to their natural places, while celestial bodies moved uniformly in perfectly circular orbits. Change, generation and corruption, so evident on earth, were unknown in the heavens. Clearly, there was precious little here of nature’s conformity to herself.

Keywords

Active Principle Celestial Body Will Emit Mechanical Principle Heavenly Body 
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Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Derek Gjertsen

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