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Hegel on Mathematics and Experimental Science

  • Louk Fleischhacker
Chapter
Part of the Archives Internationales D’Histoire Des Idées / International Archives of the History of Ideas book series (ARCH, volume 136)

Abstract

It has often been said that the experimental method was not properly appreciated by the German idealists. Schelling and Hegel did not do much experimenting, and in their writings make little mention of experimental results. If they do happen to take note of such results, they tend to miss the point of searching for mathematical connections between measurable quantities and to interpret the outcome of the work in a qualitative manner. Hegel, moreover, is extremely critical of the whole Newtonian conception of expeimental philosophy. He does, however, appear to be aware of the advantages the experimental method has over crude empiricism.

Keywords

Free Fall Extended Substance Philosophical Explanation Mathematical Connection Relative Opposition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Hegel WL II.459; MM 6.521/522.; tr. Miller p. 802.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Newton Opticks preface; Principia preface; Kant (1878) Vorrede B XI-XIII; Hertz (1894) p. 1, tr. Jones & Waller (1899).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Aristotle, Met. 5, 1020al.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hegel WL I.340; MM 6.392; tr. Miller p. 331.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Hegel DOP.94-96; tr. Adler p. 285.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hegel Encylopedia §267, Remark; MM 9.78; tr. Petry I.255,36; tr. Miller p. 59.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Hegel Encylopedia § 267, Addition; MM 9.79; tr. Petry I.257,5; tr. Miller p. 60.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Hegel Encylopedia § 267, Remark; MM 9.78; tr. Petry I.255,27; tr. Miller p. 59.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Hegel Encylopedia § 267, Addition; MM 9.79; tr. Petry I.256,36; tr. Miller p. 60.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Hegel Encylopedia § 259, Remark; MM 9.54; tr. Petry I.235.5; tr. Miller p. 39.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Hegel Encylopedia § 259, Remark; MM 9.53/53; tr. Petry I.233.33-234. 11; tr. Miller p. 38.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Cf. Hegel WL II.439ff.; MM 6.498ff.; tr. Miller pp. 783ff.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Hegel WL II.473; MM 6.537; tr. Miller pp. 814-815.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Hegel WL II.474; MM 6.538; tr. Miller p. 815.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Hegel WL II.466; MM 6.528; tr. Miller p. 808.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Dilworth 1989; 1990.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Shanker 1988.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Fleischhacker 1982.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Hegel WL II.466; MM 6.528; tr. Miller p. 808.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Fleischhacker 1982; 1987.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Hegel WL I.340; MM 5.392; tr. Miller p. 331.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Hegel Encylopedia § 108 Addition; MM 8.226; tr. Wallace p. 159.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Hegel Ph.G. 159; MM 3.216; tr. Miller p. 171 (§ 285).Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Hegel WL I.177; MM 5.209; tr. Miller p. 185.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louk Fleischhacker

There are no affiliations available

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