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Abstract

Stone fruit are a diverse group, mostly of the genus Prunus, with a characteristic lignified endocarp, a fleshy mesocarp and a thin exocarp or skin. Besides the Prunus species the group discussed here includes the olive, Olea europea.

Keywords

Ethylene Production Sweet Cherry Stone Fruit Olive Fruit Peach Fruit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

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  • C. J. Brady

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