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Abstract

The class Arachnida contains arthropods which possess neither antennae nor mandibles. It includes such diverse forms as spiders, scorpions, ticks and mites and is found in many temperate and tropical regions. Of the eleven subclasses of the Arachnida, nine are completely predaceous and have mouthparts adapted for a predatory existence. The subclasses Opiliones and Acari, however, are exceptions to the rule of total predation in arachnids.

Keywords

Lyme Disease Scrub Typhus Medical Importance Ixodid Tick Tick Bite 
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  • M. R. G. Varma

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