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Introduction to Part III

  • Martin Mulder
Chapter
Part of the Evaluation in Education and Human Services book series (EEHS, volume 43)

Abstract

The field of corporate training and development faces profound changes as to the delivery systems that are emerging due to the tremendously expanding power of electronic media. The new communications technology enables us to reduce distance problems, as we can communicate on-line with colleagues, friends, teachers and students on a global scale. The distance reduction is of course not of a physical nature, but psychologically spoken, we perceive our fellow human beings at the other end of the (e-mail or videophone) line as our neighbors. At least, the psychological distance is reduced significantly.

Keywords

Corporate Training Psychological Distance Development Device Case Study Methodology Discussion Leader 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Mulder
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TwenteNetherland

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