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Medical Laboratory Information Systems (LIS)

  • K. E. Blick

Abstract

Computerization of clinical laboratories began with attempts to automate the analysis of specimens in the early 1960s. At that time, laboratory instruments were being developed that generated analog signals that could be converted to digital information, which could be processed and stored on computers. Since computer processing was primitive during this period and the ability to store and retrieve information was limited to paper tape, punched cards and magnetic tape, early attempts at clinical laboratory computerization, while heroic, were not highly successful. Later on, concomitant with the development of disk storage and retrieval of laboratory data, a number of commercially available systems emerged during the decade beginning with the mid-1960s. Commercially available systems during this period included B-D Spear (Waltham, Massachusetts), Laboratory Computing, Inc. (Madison, Wisconsin), The Medlab Company (Salt Lake City, Utah), Community Health Computing (Houston, Texas), Honeywell (Minneapolis, Minnesota), Diversified Numerical Applications (Minneapolis, Minnesota), Advanced Medical Systems (New York, New York), Berkeley Scientific Laboratories (Hayward, California), and Medical Information Technology (Cambridge, Massachusetts).

Keywords

Clinical Laboratory Hospital Information System Anatomic Pathology Laboratory Information System Medical Record Number 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. ASTM Committee E-31 (1983) ASTM Standards on Computerized Systems. American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, PA.Google Scholar
  2. ASTM Committee E-31 (1991) Specification for Low-Level Protocol to Transfer Messages Between Clinical Laboratory Instrument and Computer Systems, ASTM Standards vol. 14.01. American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, PA.Google Scholar
  3. Elevitch, F.R. and Aller, R.D. (1989) The ABCs of LIS. ASCP Press, Chicago, IL.Google Scholar
  4. Johnson, J.L. (1975) Archiving the Optimum Information System. J.L. Johnson Associates, Northfield, IL.Google Scholar
  5. Johnson, J.L. (1976) Archiving the Optimum Information System (update). J.L. Johnson Associates, Northfield, IL.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. E. Blick

There are no affiliations available

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