Advertisement

Application of a LIMS in a pharmaceutical drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics laboratory

  • D. J. M. Graham

Abstract

One of the initial major impacts of mainstream commercial Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) has been on conventional chemistry laboratories which analyse samples from some form of process chemistry against a specification, followed by production of a certificate of analysis based on the results of that analysis and subsequent approval of that sample for further use [1]. In such cases, the analysis of a given sample is generally independent of the analysis of other samples being analysed at the same time. This meant that the LIMS databases were very much sample- and specification-orientated, and little or no functionality was provided to allow the manipulation of batches of related samples. In time, as the acceptance of these applications has become fact, some vendors have made attempts to increase the market appeal of their systems by attempting to promote a broader applicability without changing the basic underlying structure of their systems. They have done this by adding functionalities to support this wider applicability of their system.

Keywords

Drug Metabolism Current Application Laboratory Information Management System Sample Record Nominal Time 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Hunsmann, N. and Picht, W. (1992) Aspects of laboratory information management systems in the chemical industry. Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems: Laboratory Information Management, 13, 239–245.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Maj, S.P. (1991) Analysis and design of Laboratory Information Management Systems. Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems: Laboratory Information Management, 13, 157–162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Jack, W., Smith, J.R. and Svirbely, J.R. (1988) Laboratory information systems. M D Computing, 5 (1), 38–47.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    McDowall, R.D. (1993) The valuation and management of risk during a laboratory information management system or laboratory automation project. Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems: Laboratory Information Management, 21, 1–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    McDowall, R.D. (1993) Laboratory information management systems and database management issues. Analytical Proceedings, 30, 201–202.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Cooper, E.L., Hice, R.C. and Rahn, P.D. (1992) Future trends in the integration and implementation of a laboratory information management system in an instrumentation laboratory. Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems: Laboratory Information Management, 13, 215–220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Faulkner, H.C. III, Farmen, R.H., Myer, R.S., Hahn, E.M. and Rouse, J.A. (1992) LIMS: evolution of second-generation systems. Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems: Laboratory Information Management, 13, 211–214.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. M. Graham

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations