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Standards for analytical laboratory data communications, storage, and archival

  • R. S. Lysakowski

Abstract

Every year many thousands of analytical, clinical, and biological chemistry laboratories throughout the world generate terabytes of data. Chromatography and spectroscopy are the high-production techniques for most of these laboratories. In sheer volume alone, more than 70% of all analytical data are chromatographic data. Instrument manufacturers sell more than 10 000 new chromatography instruments per year, and nearly all of them are made to meet some set of customer specifications. Virtually all chromatographic data handling systems are proprietary, and have many different features and data processing capabilities. Yet these commercial systems all collect a similar, overlapping base of data elements running on fewer than six common types of computer operating systems. Logically, because they collect many very similar data elements, these instruments should be able to communicate and share data, regardless of the manufacturer of the equipment.

Keywords

Information Class Instrument Manufacturer Standard File Format Class Inheritance Analytical Data Standard 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

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  • R. S. Lysakowski

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