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The Necessity of Radical Choice

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The Radical Choice and Moral Theory

Part of the book series: Analecta Husserliana ((ANHU,volume 45))

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Abstract

Speaking of the (rational) communication community as an institution, Apel remarks:

More accurately, [this] institution could be characterized as the meta-institution of all possible human institutions, since it involves the conditions of the possibility of transparent and rational conventions (“agreements”). Man can withdraw from this institution only at the price of losing the possibility of identifying himself as a meaningfully acting being — for instance, in suicide from existential despair or in the pathological process of paranoid-autistic loss of self.1

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Notes

  1. Karl-Otto Apel, “The Problem of Philosophical Foundations in Light of a Transcendental Pragmatics of Language,” in After Philosophy: End or Transformation? eds. Kenneth Baynes et al. (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1987), p. 281.

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  2. Karl-Otto Apel, Towards a Transformation of Philosophy, (London/Boston: Routledge and Paul, 1979), pp. 258–260.

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  3. Alan Gewirth, Reason and Morality (Chicago and London: The Univ. of Chicago Press, 1978), pp. 43–44.

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  4. Alan Gewirth, “The ‘Is-Ought’ Problem Resolved,“ in Moral Philosophy: Selected Readings, ed. George Sher (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1987), pp. 323–324.

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  5. Steven Ross, “A Comment on the Argument between Gewirth and His Critics,” Metaphilosophy 21 (1990): 411.

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  6. Paul Edwards, Heidegger and Death: a Critical Evaluation (La Salle: The Hegeler Institute, 1979), p. 60.

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  7. See G. Marian Kinget, On Being Human: a Systematic View (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1975), pp. 9–22.

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  8. G. Marian Kinget, On Being Human: a Systematic View (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1975), p. 15.

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  9. Jürgen Habermas, “Moral Consciousness and Communicative Action,” in Moral Consciousness and Communicative Action, trans. C. Lenhardt & S. W. Nicholsen, intro. T. McCarthy (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1990), p. 121.

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© 1994 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

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Zhai, Z. (1994). The Necessity of Radical Choice . In: The Radical Choice and Moral Theory. Analecta Husserliana, vol 45. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-0501-9_3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-0501-9_3

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Dordrecht

  • Print ISBN: 978-94-010-4223-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-94-011-0501-9

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