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Traditional Ecological Knowledge, Biodiversity, Resilience and Sustainability

  • Fikret Berkes
  • Carl Folke
  • Madhav Gadgil
Part of the Ecology, Economy & Environment book series (ECEE, volume 4)

Abstract

Much of the world’s biodiversity has been in the hands of traditional peoples, societies of hunters and gatherers, herders, fishers, agriculturists, for a great many generations. Most living resources of the earth have been utilised for a historically long time; exceptions are few (e.g., open-ocean and deep-sea species). As Gomez-Pompa and Kaus [1990] observed, even tropical forests of the Amazon were not untouched environments but the result of the last ‘cycle of abandonment’ by traditional users. The fact is that pre-scientific, traditional systems of management have been the main means by which societies have managed natural resources for millennia [Berkes and Farvar, 1989; Gadgil et al., 1993]. In many cases, the main reason we have any biological diversity to speak about is because of these systems of management.

Keywords

Biodiversity Conservation World View Traditional Knowledge Indigenous Knowledge Home Garden 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fikret Berkes
  • Carl Folke
  • Madhav Gadgil

There are no affiliations available

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