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A history of low vision and blind rehabilitation in the United States

  • Joseph W. Sassani
Part of the History of Ophthalmology book series (ACOI, volume 7)

Abstract

The author presents a history of services for the blind and those with low vision in the United States focusing on the areas of orientation and mobility, and rehabilitation teaching. The controversies involving the development of these specialties are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the role of Father Thomas Carroll in the establishment of low vision and blind services for the military and veterans administrations. Published data regarding the past role of ophthalmologists in obtaining low vision services for patients is reviewed. The opportunity for a more active role for ophthalmologic involvement in the rehabilitation of the low vision and blind patient is discussed.

Key words

History Vision rehabilitation Low vision Blindness 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph W. Sassani
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Ophthalmology and Pathology, Pennsylvania Lions Vision and Research CenterPenn State University College of MedicineHersheyUSA

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