Skip to main content

A Bargaining Model for Social Status in Informal Groups and Formal Organizations

  • Chapter

Part of the Theory and Decision Library book series (TDLU,volume 12)

Abstract

Apart from economic payoffs, social status (social rank) seems to be the most important incentive and motivating force of social behavior. This concern for social status is perhaps more conspicuous in those societies, like the American, where the ruling ideology encourages a striving for upward social mobility, for movement to higher social status positions. But it seems to be no less important in those societies, like the traditional Indian caste society, which prevent or strongly discourage upward mobility—for at least downward mobility is possible in every society as punishment for nonfulfillment or certain social obligations. Thus the only difference is that in such less mobile societies, people’s concern for social status will take the form of simply trying to maintain their existing status and caste positions and of avoiding all types of nonconformist behavior possibly endangering these positions.

Keywords

  • Social Status
  • Social Group
  • Deferential Behavior
  • Bargaining Model
  • High Social Status

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Behavioral Science, 11 (1966), 357–369.

The original version of this paper was presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association in Chicago, September, 1964. It was distributed as Working Paper No. 94 of the Center for Research in Management Science, University of California, Berkeley.

I have been very gratified to find that—on the basis of very extensive empirical research, and without any reliance on game-theoretical considerations—Peter M. Blau (1964) has arrived at a theory of social status very similar to the theory proposed in this paper, which is based on a game-theoretical bargaining model.

The research reported in this paper was partially supported by a grant from the Ford Foundation to the Graduate School of Business Administration, University of California, Berkeley.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-94-010-9327-9_11
  • Chapter length: 21 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   169.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-94-010-9327-9
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   219.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  • Blau, P. M.: Exchange and Power in Social Life, New York: John Wiley, 1964.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dahl, R. A.: ‘The Concept of Power’, Behav. Sci., 1957, 2, 201–215.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Davis, K., & Wilbert E. Moore: ‘Some Principles of Stratification’, Amér. Soci. Rev., 1945, 10, 242–249.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Harsanyi, J. C.: ‘Measurement of Social Power, Opportunity Costs, and the Theory of Two-Person Bargaining Games’, Behav. Sci., 1962a 7, 67–80.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Harsanyi, J. C.: ‘Measurement of Social Power in n-Person Reciprocal Power Situations’, Behav. Sci., 1962b, 7, 81–91.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Homans, G. C.: ‘Social Behavior: Its Elementary Forms’, New York: Harcourt, Brace, & World, 1961.

    Google Scholar 

  • Maine, Sir H. J. S.: Ancient Law, London: J. Murray, 1901.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wynne-Edwards, V. C.: Animal Dispersion in Relation to Social Behavior, Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd, 1962.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 1980 D. Reidel Publishing Company, Dordrecht, Holland

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Harsanyi, J.C. (1980). A Bargaining Model for Social Status in Informal Groups and Formal Organizations. In: Essays on Ethics, Social Behavior, and Scientific Explanation. Theory and Decision Library, vol 12. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-010-9327-9_11

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-010-9327-9_11

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Dordrecht

  • Print ISBN: 978-90-277-1186-1

  • Online ISBN: 978-94-010-9327-9

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive