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Contemporary Despair and its Antidote

  • Errol E. Harris
Chapter
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Part of the Archives Internationales D’Histoire des Idees International Archives of the History of Ideas book series (ARCH, volume 59)

Abstract

The prevalent mood of contemporary mankind is one of despair, for never before have the prospects of civilization seemed gloomier or the situation of mankind more helpless. The extinction of the race within the foreseeable future seems threatened from every quarter, whether by the exhaustion of the resources of the earth, or by the pollution of the sea and its life-giving waters, or by the destruction of the ecological systems in which living species cooperate to maintain themselves and one another. All these deleterious processes seem to be happening at an accelerating pace without any deliberate action on the part of man and despite such feeble efforts as he has yet made or seems likely to make to stem the tide of deterioration.

Keywords

Final Satisfaction Scientific Attitude Existentialist Critique Great Philosopher Copernican Revolution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Cf. K. Popper, The Logic of Scientific Discovery (London, 1959; New York, 1961); N. R. Hanson, Patterns of Discovery (Cambridge, 1958); T. Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (Chicago, 1962); I. Lakatos and A. Musgrave, Criticism and the Growth of Knowledge (Cambridge, 1970); and my Hypothesis and Perception (London, 1970).Google Scholar
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    Cf. H. Horkheimer’s discussion in The Eclipse of Reason (O.U.P., 1947).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, Netherlands 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Errol E. Harris
    • 1
  1. 1.Northwestern UniversityUSA

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