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The Frankfurt Association and the Treaty of Ryswick, 1696–1699

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Part of the Archives Internationales d’Histoire des Idees / International Archives of the History of Ideas book series (ARMI, volume 5)

Abstract

The Association had quickly run into difficulties in the Diet of the Upper Rhenish Circle.1 The situation was somewhat different in the Electoral Rhenish Circle where, other than the three spiritual Electorates and the Palatinate, there were only the tiniest states. The Diet of the Circle met at Frankfurt on January 7, 1697. Mainz, Trier, the Palatinate and the German Order at Coblenz were the only states of the Circle to send delegates. The most noteable absentee was the Elector of Cologne. Joseph Clement was young, headstrong and completely dominated by his brother, Max Emanuel, whose attitude toward the Association was highly equivocal. Joseph Clement had formerly been cool toward the scheme.2 Now he promised to send an envoy to the Congress, but warned that as he was already in a defensive alliance with the Palatinate, Brandenburg and the States-General, he had no troops to spare for the defense of the Upper Rhine. This declaration angered Lothar Franz. Cologne was the largest of the ecclesiastical states and could make a vital contribution. It was because of her size and population that Cologne had consistently pursued an independent policy and was closer to being an armed state than one of the unarmed pygmies of the “Third Germany.”

Keywords

Armed State Independent Policy Standing Army Powerful Neighbor Peace Conference 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1973

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