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Suppressive Effect of Electrolyzed-Reduced Water on the Growth of Cancer Cells and Microorganisms

  • Takaaki Komatsu
  • Shigeru Kabayama
  • Akira Hayashida
  • Hirofuma Nogami
  • Kiichiro Teruya
  • Yoshinori Katakura
  • Kazumiti Otsubo
  • Shinkatsu Morisawa
  • Sanetaka Shirahata
Chapter
Part of the ESACT Proceedings book series (ESACT, volume 1)

Abstract

We investigated the suppressive effect of electrolyzed reduced water (ERW) on the growth of not only various human cancer cells but also microorganisms such as gram-negative Escherichia coli. ERW suppressed the growth of cancer cells, especially in soft-agar culture. The suppressive effect of ERW on the growth of cancer cells depended upon cell types and malignancy of cancer cells and the production methods of ERW. We assumed that scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by ERW resulted in impairing the tumor phenotypes such as rapid proliferation and anchorage-independent growth without affecting serious damage to normal cells. We also found that ERW exhibited weak microbicidal effect, especially in low cell densities of microorganisms. It may contribute to prevent the rot of food or improve the intestinal microflora to prevent abnormal fermentation.

Keywords

Suppressive Effect Colony Formation Ability Microbicidal Activity Intracellular Redox State Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Line 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takaaki Komatsu
    • 1
  • Shigeru Kabayama
    • 2
  • Akira Hayashida
    • 1
  • Hirofuma Nogami
    • 1
  • Kiichiro Teruya
    • 1
  • Yoshinori Katakura
    • 1
  • Kazumiti Otsubo
    • 2
  • Shinkatsu Morisawa
    • 2
  • Sanetaka Shirahata
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Genetic Resources Technology Kyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan
  2. 2.Nihon Trim Co. Ltd.OsakaJapan

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