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Adaptation of 24-Hour Hormonal Patterns and Sleep to Jet Lag

  • Eve Van Cauter
  • Samuel Refetoff
  • Daniel Desir
  • Claude Jadot
  • Michelle Fevre-Montange
  • Victor S. Fang
  • Jacqueline Golstein
  • Marc L’Hermite
  • Claude Robyn
  • Pierre Noel
  • Jean-Paul Spire
  • Georges Copinschi
Part of the Developments in Endocrinology book series (DIEN, volume 1)

Abstract

Effects of rapid transmeridian time shifts on behavioral and biological parameters such as vigilance, heart rate, and urinary excretion of electrolytes and corticosteroids have been demonstrated (1, 2, 3). Because of the key role played by hormones in the adaptation to the environment, disruptions in the temporal organization of hormonal secretion might be involved in the production of the jet lag syndrome. The current availability of sensitive hormone assays has made it possible to test this hypothesis. Moreover, assessment of jet lag induced changes of the 24-h hormonal profiles and their pattern of adaptation is expected to bring further insight into the control of the various hormonal rhythms, the identity of their zeitgebers and their possible interrelationships.

Keywords

Total Plasma Protein Cortisol Peak Disruption Score Melatonin Rhythm Hormonal Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ECSC, EEC, EAEC, Brussels-Luxembourg 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eve Van Cauter
    • 1
    • 6
  • Samuel Refetoff
    • 6
  • Daniel Desir
    • 2
  • Claude Jadot
    • 3
  • Michelle Fevre-Montange
    • 9
  • Victor S. Fang
    • 7
  • Jacqueline Golstein
    • 1
  • Marc L’Hermite
    • 4
  • Claude Robyn
    • 4
  • Pierre Noel
    • 5
  • Jean-Paul Spire
    • 8
  • Georges Copinschi
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Interdisciplinary Research (LMN)Free University of BrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.Laboratory of Experimental MedicineFree University of BrusselsBelgium
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryFree University of BrusselsBelgium
  4. 4.Department of Gynecology and ObstetricsFree University of BrusselsBelgium
  5. 5.Department of Pediatric Neurology, School of MedicineFree University of BrusselsBelgium
  6. 6.Thyroid Study UnitThe University of ChicagoUSA
  7. 7.Endocrinology LaboratoryThe University of ChicagoUSA
  8. 8.Laboratory of Clinical NeurophysiologyThe University of ChicagoUSA
  9. 9.Laboratory of Endocrinology, Hôpital de l’AntiquailleUniversity of LyonFrance

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