Contributions to the ecology of halophytes pp 35-60

Part of the Tasks for vegetation science book series (TAVS, volume 2)

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The biogeography of mangroves

  • Hartmut Barth

Abstract

The determination of a number of mangrove species in a particular location of the world requires first the definition of the word ‘mangrove’: This term has a double meaning: 1) it is used for a mainly woody plant formation, distributed in the tropical or subtropical tidal zone between the lowest and highest tide water mark; 2) it is used for a plant speciesof this formation. These species are usually woody.

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© Dr W. Junk Publishers, The Hague, The Netherlands 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hartmut Barth
    • 1
  1. 1.FB 5 Biologie/Chemie Arbeitsgruppe ÖkologieUniversität OsnabrückOsnabrückGermany

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