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A Theory of Human Memory: Self-Organization and Performance of Sensory-Motor Codes, Maps, and Plans

  • Stephen Grossberg
Chapter
Part of the Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science book series (BSPS, volume 70)

Abstract

This article suggests a psychophysiological foundation for cognitive theory, and more generally for goal-oriented or purposive behavior. Of all my articles, this is the one which drives deepest into uncharted territory. I say this partly because new implications of my own concepts and constructions in the article are still crystallizing in my mind.

Keywords

Conditioned Stimulus Order Information Contingent Negative Variation Adaptive Code Sensory Expectation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company, Dordrecht, Holland 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Grossberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MathematicsBoston UniversityUSA

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