Eugenic Utopias — Blueprints for the Rationalization of Human Evolution

  • Peter Weingart
Part of the Sociology of the Sciences a Yearbook book series (SOSC, volume 8)

Abstract

Scientific Utopias reveal an aspect of science that is hidden by ‘normal science’ and its ideology. Especially at times when new research areas are opened up or when new discoveries have been made they are formulated to demarcate the explanatory claims of the field. They are also used to stake the claims of orienting perception and behavior to be based on systematic knowledge provided by the new field and replacing prior, so-called non-systematic types of knowledge; perhaps most importantly, they are used to define the ethical and institutional resistances anticipated by the sciences in implementing these claims. To look at scientific Utopias is of particular interest, therefore, because they reveal the value-base of a field in a very fundamental sense, in that they are both a blueprint for the envisaged scientific rationalization and an outline of the research strategy to be pursued to that end. Scientific Utopias spell out the direct link between the cognitive plan of discovery (definition of subject matter, methods, explanatory goods) and the social target to be reached through implementation — behavioral changes, institutional reorganization, and re-definition of values.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    Max Weber, ‘Wissenschaft als Beruf’, Gesammelte Aufsätze zur Wissenschaftslehre, Tübingen, 1922, p. 536.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Francis Galton, ‘Eugenics, Its Definition, Scope and Aims’, Sociological Papers 1 (1905) 45.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ibid., p. 46.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ibid., p. 50.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
  6. 6.
    Cf. Sheila F. Weiss, Race Hygiene and the Rational Management of National Efficiency: Wilhelm Schallmayer and the Origins of German Eugenics, 1890–1920, Ann Arbor: University Microfilms, 1983.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Alfred Ploetz, Die Tüchtigkeit unserer Rasse und der Schutz der Schwachen, Berlin, 1895, p. 235.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Ibid., p. 225.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Ibid., 143 p.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ibid., 114 p.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Wilhelm Schallmayer, Vererbung und Auslese, 3rd ed., Jena: G. Fischer, 1918, p. 429.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Christian von Ehrenfels, ‘Die konstitutive Verderblichkeit der Monogamie’, Archiv für Rassen- und Gesellschaftsbiologie 4 (1907) 813,Google Scholar
  13. 12a.
    Christian von Ehrenfels, ‘Die konstitutive Verderblichkeit der Monogamie’, Archiv für Rassen- und Gesellschaftsbiologie 4 (1907) 817.Google Scholar
  14. 13.
    Cf. W. Schallmayer, Vererbung und Auslese, p. 433.Google Scholar
  15. 14.
    Willibald Hentschel, Mittgart, Ein Weg zur Erneuerung der germanischen Rasse, 3rd ed., Dresden: Mittgartbund, 1911, p. 23.Google Scholar
  16. 15.
    W. Schallmayer, Vererbung und Auslese, p. 381.Google Scholar
  17. 16.
    Alfred Ploetz, ‘Willibald Hentschels Vorschlag zur Hebung unserer Rasse’, Archiv für Rassen-und Gesellschaftsbiologie 1 (1904) 885–895.Google Scholar
  18. 17.
    W. Schallmayer, Vererbung und Auslese, p. 381.Google Scholar
  19. 18.
    R. Walther Darré, Neuadel aus Blut und Boden, München: J. F. Lehmanns Verlag, 1930, p. 170.Google Scholar
  20. 19.
    Ibid., pp. 187,Google Scholar
  21. 19a.
    R. Walther Darré, Neuadel aus Blut und Boden, München: J. F. Lehmanns Verlag, 1930, 190.Google Scholar
  22. 20.
    Fritz Lenz, Menschliche Auslese und Rassenhygiene (Eugenik), 4th ed., München: J. F. Lehmanns Verlag, 1932, 381 pp.Google Scholar
  23. 21.
    F. Galton, Eugenics.Google Scholar
  24. 22.
    Alexander Tille, Von Darwin bis Nietzsche, Ein Buch Entwicklungsethik, Leipzig: C. G. Naumann, 1895, p. 177.Google Scholar
  25. 23.
    Wilhelm Schallmayer, Generative Ethik’, Archiv für Rassen- und Gesellschaftsbiologie 6 (1909) 214,Google Scholar
  26. 23a.
    Wilhelm Schallmayer, Generative Ethik’, Archiv für Rassen- und Gesellschaftsbiologie 6 (1909) 215.Google Scholar
  27. 24.
    Alfred Ploetz, ‘Ableitung einer Gesellschafts-Hygiene und ihrer Beziehungen zur Ethik’, Archiv für Rassen- und Gesellschaftsbiologie 3 (1906) 253,Google Scholar
  28. 24a.
    Alfred Ploetz, ‘Ableitung einer Gesellschafts-Hygiene und ihrer Beziehungen zur Ethik’, Archiv für Rassen- und Gesellschaftsbiologie 3 (1906) 257,Google Scholar
  29. 24b.
    Alfred Ploetz, ‘Ableitung einer Gesellschafts-Hygiene und ihrer Beziehungen zur Ethik’, Archiv für Rassen- und Gesellschaftsbiologie 3 (1906) 258.Google Scholar
  30. 25.
    A. Gütt, E. Rüdin, and F. Ruttke, Gesetz zur Verhütung erb kranken Nachwuchses, München, 1936, p. 67.Google Scholar
  31. 25a.
    Cf. also F. Ruttke, ‘Erb- und Rassenpflege in Gesetz und Rechtsprechung des 3. Reiches’, Juristische Wochenschrift, 64, 19 (May 1935) 1369–1376.Google Scholar
  32. 26.
    Allgemeine Zeitung, 211 (May 6, 1936).Google Scholar
  33. 27.
    Die Ordnungsgesetze der SS, SS Oberabschnitt West, Düsseldorf, 1 and 2 (1938).Google Scholar
  34. 28.
    Cited in Hedwig Conrad-Martius, Utopien der Menschen züchtung, München, 1955, p. 102.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Weingart
    • 1
  1. 1.Forschungsschwerpunkt WissenschaftsforschungUniversität BielefeldBielefeldGermany

Personalised recommendations