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Polyamine catabolism in higher plants: Characterization of pyrroline dehydrogenase

  • Hector E. Flores
  • Philip Filner
Part of the Advances in Agricultural Biotechnology book series (AABI, volume 18)

Abstract

Both mono- and dicotyledonous species catabolize putrescine to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), but by two different pathways. GABA is the major labeled product in pea shoots and oil leaves fed with a 2–4 h pulse of [l,4-14C]-putrescine (Put) or [1,4- tetramethylene-14C]-spermidine (Spd), respectively.In the presence of 1-10μM gabaculine, a specific inhibitor of GABA:pyruvate-transaminase, the label appearing in GABA increase 2 to 7-fold, which indicates that the transmination reaction is a major fate of GABA formed from Put or Spd In vivo. The conversions to GABA were demonstrated in vitro in coupled assays involving diamine oxidase from pea or polyamine oxidase from oat, and pyrroline dehydrogenase (PYRR-DH). The latter enzyme from either pea or oat is strictly NAD-dependent and is specific for pyrroline. The optimal temperature (40–45°C) and pH (7.5–8.0) are similar to those of bacterial PYRR-DH. In all cases the enzyme was inhibited by the NAD analogs thionicotinamide and aminopyridine dinucleotide (0.1—1.0 mM). In addition to pea and oat, PYRR-DH was also detected in corn, barley, soybean and broadbean Di-and polyamine oxidase are released by enzymes which degrade the cell wall, while PYRR-DH remains associated with the protoplast.

Keyword

γ-aminobutyric acid gabaculine pea polyamine pyrroline dehydrogenase oat 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff/Dr W. Junk Publishers, Dordrecht 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hector E. Flores
    • 1
  • Philip Filner
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Plant Pathology and Crop PhysiologyLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA
  2. 2.ARCO Plant Cell Research InstituteDublinUSA

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