The Genetic Bases of Relationships between Microbial Parasites and their Hosts

  • I. R. Crute
Part of the Advances in Agricultural Biotechnology book series (AABI, volume 17)

Abstract

Historical perspective. Loss of reproductive capacity due to infectious disease is one of many selective forces operating in natural plant populations (Harlan, 1976; Levin, 1975). One result of the imposed selection is the evolution of genotypes exhibiting an enhanced capability to reproduce despite the prevalence of a disease-causing agent. There is now clear evidence that disease resistance and tolerance are important features of natural plant populations (Segal etal., 1980; Ben Kalio & Clarke, 1979).

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© Martinus Nijhoff/Dr W. Junk Publishers, Dordrecht 1985

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  • I. R. Crute

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