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The Development of Sensitivity of Kenetic, Binocular and Pictorial Depth Information in Human Infants

  • Albert Yonas
  • Carl E. Granrud
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASID, volume 21)

Abstract

A program of research is described that explores the development of sensitivity to three classes of spatial information in human infants. The research suggests that sensitivity to kinetic, binocular and pictorial depth information develops in a fixed sequence. Some sensitivity to kinetic information may be present at birth or soon thereafter; sensitivity to binocular information appears between three and five months; and sensitivity to static monocular information appears between five and 7 months of age. These findings may direct research on the development of neural mechanisms that underlie the emergence of responsiveness to spatial information in human infants.

Keywords

Virtual Object Depth Perception Spatial Layout Motion Parallax Binocular Disparity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Dordrecht 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert Yonas
    • 1
  • Carl E. Granrud
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Child DevelopmentUniversity of MinnesotaUSA

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