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Molecular Analysis of the Human Interleukin-2 Receptor

  • Warner C. Greene
  • Joel M. Depper
  • Gerald R. Crabtree
  • Stuart Rudikoff
  • Janet Pumphrey
  • Richard J. Robb
  • Martin Kronke
  • Penny Svetlik
  • Nancy J. Peffer
  • Thomas A. Waldmann
  • Warren J. Leonard
Part of the Developments in Oncology book series (DION, volume 31)

Abstract

Complete expression of the human immune response requires the generation of activated T cells1. This activation sequence is initiated by an interaction of antigen with specific receptors present on the membrane of resting T cells. This receptor-ligand interaction, in the presence of macrophage derived interleukin-1 (IL-1), then triggers the production of interleukin-2 (IL-2, previously designated T cell growth factor)2,3. IL-2 is a well-characterized 14,500 dalton glycoprotein which promotes T cell proliferation following binding to specific high affinity IL-2 membrane receptors4–6. However, unlike receptors for antigen, IL-2 receptors are not expressed by resting T cells, but like IL-2, are synthesized following antigen activation. The interaction of IL-2 with its inducible receptor results in T cell proliferation and expansion of the antigen reactive T cell clone and culminates in the emergence of T cells mediating helper, suppressor, and cytotoxic T cell function. Thus, both the specificity and magnitude of the T cell immune response is in large measure controlled at the level of IL-2 receptor expression.

Keywords

Primary Translation Product Polyadenylation Signal Sequence Hairy Cell Leukemia Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Dordrecht 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Warner C. Greene
  • Joel M. Depper
  • Gerald R. Crabtree
  • Stuart Rudikoff
  • Janet Pumphrey
  • Richard J. Robb
  • Martin Kronke
  • Penny Svetlik
  • Nancy J. Peffer
  • Thomas A. Waldmann
  • Warren J. Leonard

There are no affiliations available

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