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Unwanted Side-Effects from Topical Agents and Tests for Them

  • R. Marks

Abstract

The skin is not a canvas on which cosmeticians can indiscriminately paint a delectable youthful scene; neither is it a sheet of denim from which grease and filth can be removed by scrubbing with alkaline solutions or strong detergents. It is an efficient but vulnerable membrane that grudgingly allows a controlled exchange of substances between the delicate tissues within and the threatening external environment. Its vulnerability is increased by persistent or repeated intimate contact with a foreign material, which is why any form of topical application can prove harmful.

Keywords

Stratum Corneum Contact Dermatitis Patch Test Sodium Lauryl Sulphate Allergic Contact Dermatitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© MTP Press Limited 1985

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  • R. Marks

There are no affiliations available

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