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The Interdisciplinary Phenomenology of Man and of the Human Condition A Dialogue between Chinese and Occidental Philosophy in Meeting the Challenge of Our Times

  • Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka
Part of the The Yearbook of Phenomenological Research book series (ANHU, volume 21)

Abstract

Among the variety of contemporary philosophies the Chinese and Occidental in particular stand out in respect of the wealth of their historical inheritance. In spite of their respective differentiations into trends, schools, and systems of ideas they oppose each other because of their striking originalities. This contrast, which is attributed to their so-called different “cultural frameworks,” is ultimately the fruit of the difference in man’s attitude to the cosmic forces, Nature, his fellowman, and his own personal destiny; this attitude culminates in man’s estimation of his role with respect to his Human Condition. These contrasting differences, which are rooted in man’s vital responses to the circumambient factors in his life-struggle and which are experiencing deep transformatory processes as well as mutual influences, prevailed until our times.

Keywords

Human Condition Vital Rationality Chinese Philosophy Radical Challenge Intuitive Insight 
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Notes

  1. 1.
    The Crisis of Culture, Analecta Husserliana, vol. V, D. Reidel, Dordrecht, 1976.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, “The Initial Spontaneity,” ibid.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, “Phenomenology of Man and of the Human Condition,” in Phenomenology of Man and of the Human Condition; Plotting the Territory for Interdisciplinary Communication, Analecta Husserliana, vol. XIV, 1983.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, “The Phenomenology of Man and of the Human Condition in Communication with the Human Sciences,” ibid.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Phenomenology of Life in a Dialogue between Chinese and Occidental Philosophy, Analecta Husserliana, vol. XVII, 1984.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, “Phenomenology of Man and of the Human Condition in Communication with the Human Sciences”; also cf. Angela Ales Bello, “Phenomenology of Man and of the Human Condition”, a review-article in Phenomenology Information Bulletin, a Review of Philosophical Ideas and Trends, issue 7, 1983, World Phenomenology Institute, 348 Payson Road, Belmont, MA.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Phenomenology of Life in a Dialogue between Chinese and Occidental Philosophy Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, “Beyond Ingarden’s Idealism/Realism Controversy with Husserl; the Third Phase of Phenomenology,” a monograph in Ingardeniana, Analecta Husserliana, vol. IV, 1976.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, “Natural Spontaneity in the Translacing Continuity of Beingness,” in Analecta Husserliana, vol. XIV, 1983.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
  11. 11.
    Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, “Harmony in Becoming and Self-individualization of Life,” Phenomenology of Life in a Dialogue between Chinese and Occidental Philosophy, Analecta Husserliana, Vol. XVII, 1983.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, “The Moral Sense in the Foundations of the Social World,” a monograph, Analecta Husserliana, vol. XV, 1984.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, “The Prototype of Action: Ethical or Creative,” Analecta Husserliana, vol. VII, 1978.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka
    • 1
  1. 1.The World Phenomenology InstituteUSA

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