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Biochemistry of Forest Tree Species in Culture

Chapter
Part of the Forestry Sciences book series (FOSC, volume 24-26)

Abstract

While tissue culture systems represent an area of major potential in tree biology, cell culture systems are ideally suited for investigations aimed at achieving a greater understanding of the cellular physiology and biochemistry of tree species. Over the years a number of tree species have been established in cell culture and a variety of information has been obtained from such sources. We now have a greater understanding of the influence of various factors on growth rate, mechanisms of resistance against microbial attack and secondary product biosynthesis.

Keywords

Suspension Culture Nitrate Reductase Glutamine Synthetase Cell Suspension Culture Pentose Phosphate Pathway 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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