Advertisement

Analytical pyrolysis as a taxonomic tool in Gracilaria (Rhodophyta: Gigartinales)

  • C. J. Bird
  • R. J. Helleur
  • E. R. Hayes
  • J. McLachlan
Part of the Developments in Hydrobiology book series (DIHY, volume 41)

Abstract

Species of Gracilaria Greville are known to differ in the chemical structure, hence, physical properties of their extracted agar (e.g., Hong et al., 1969; Craigie et al., 1984). Thus, agar composition can be useful taxonomically, possibly serving to distinguish taxa that are not easily differentiated by morphology or other conventional criteria. However, as analysis of agar usually involves destruction of considerable amounts of plant material, it is impractical for most taxonomic purposes.

Key words

seaweed pyrolysis taxonomy agar Gracilaria 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bird, K. T., M. D. Hanisak & J. Ryther, 1981. Chemical quality and production of agars extracted from Gracilaria tikvahiae grown in different nitrogen enrichment conditions. Bot. mar. 24: 441–444.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Craigie, J. S. & Z. C. Wen, 1984. Effects of temperature and tissue age on gel strength and composition of agar from Gracilaria tikvahiae (Rhodophyceae). Can. J. Bot. 62: 1665–1670.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Craigie, J. S., Z. C. Wen & J. P. van der Meer, 1984. Interspecific, intraspecific and nutritionally—determined variations in the composition of agars from Gracilaria spp. Bot. mar. 27: 55–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Garbary, D. & M. Mortimer, 1978. Use and analysis of pyrolysis- gas-liquid chromatography in algal taxonomy. Phycologia 17: 105–107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Helleur, R. J., E. R. Hayes, W. D. Jamieson & J. S. Craigie, 1985a. Analysis of polysaccharide pyrolysate of red algae by capillary gas chromatography—mass spectrometry. J. anal, appl. Pyrol. 8: 333–347.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Helleur, R. J., E. R. Hayes, J. S. Craigie & J. McLachlan, 1985b. Characterization of polysaccharides of red algae by pyrolysis-capillary gas chromatography. J. anal. appl. Pyrol. 8: 349–357.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Holmgren, P. K., W. Keuken & E. K. Schofield, 1981. Index herbariorum, I. The herbaria of the world, 7th ed. Regnum Veg. 106: 1–452.Google Scholar
  8. Hong, K. C., M. E. Goldstein & W. Yaphe, 1969. A chemical and enzymic analysis of the polysaccharides from Gracilaria. Proc. int. Seaweed Symp. 6: 473–482.Google Scholar
  9. Irwin, W. J., 1979. Analytical pyrolysis — an overview. J. anal, appl. Pyrol. 1: 3–25, 89–122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Nichols, H. W., D. J. Anderson, J. I. Shaw & M. R. Sommer- feld, 1968. Pyrolysis-gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of chlorophycean and rhodophycean algae. J. Phycol. 4: 362–368.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Oliveira, E. C. de, C. J. Bird & J. McLachlan, 1983. The genus Gracilaria (Rhodophyta, Gigartinalis) in the western Atlantic. Gracilaria domingensis, G. cervicornis and G. ferox. Can. J. Bot. 61: 2999 – 3008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Santos, G. A. & M. S. Doty, 1983. Agarose from Gracilaria cylindrica. Bot. mar. 26: 31–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Smith, A. H., K. Nichols & J. McLachlan, 1984. Cultivation of seamoss (Gracilaria) in St. Lucia, West Indies. Proc. int. Seaweed Symp. 11: 249–251.Google Scholar
  14. Sprung, D. C. & D. E. Wujek, 1971. Chemotaxonomic studies of Pleurastrum Chodat by means of pyrolysis-gas-liquid chromatography. Phycologia 10: 251–254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Taylor, W. R., 1960. Marine algae of the eastern tropical and subtropical coasts of the Americas. Univ. Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, MI: 870 pp.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Dr W. Junk Publishers, Dordrecht 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. J. Bird
    • 1
  • R. J. Helleur
    • 2
  • E. R. Hayes
    • 2
  • J. McLachlan
    • 1
  1. 1.National Research Council of CanadaHalifaxCanada
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryAcadia UniversityWolfvilleCanada

Personalised recommendations