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Experienced Freedom and Moral Freedom in the Child’s Consciousness

  • F. J. J. Buytendijk
Chapter
Part of the Phaenomenologica book series (PHAE, volume 103)

Abstract

No other word has so much power to divert the mind of man from the fatigues of toil, from cares, from the hazards of emotional involvements, from all selfishness and meanness, as the word freedom. The magic power of this word is so great that the burning desire for freedom is not merely an appeal to a well-determined concept, but it opens a door to another climate. In the name of freedom the most sublime sacrifices and the most revolting injustices have been committed. No one knows exactly what freedom is, but all consider it as the sovereign good. Humanity’s history and each particular man’s history are exclusively determined by their relation to freedom.

Keywords

Classic Psychology Moral Consciousness Human Reality Positive Science Relative Freedom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Dordrecht 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. J. J. Buytendijk

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