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Environmental causes of cancer in man

  • R. Montesano
  • D. M. Parkin
  • L. Tomatis
Part of the Cancer Biology and Medicine book series (CABM, volume 1)

Abstract

While screening programmes can reduce mortality from cervical cancer, and to a lesser extent, that from breast cancer1, the early detection of other cancers and the treatment of established disease are likely to have a rather limited impact in reducing mortality due to the major human cancers. It has been estimated, for example, that, while modern surgery is effective in significantly decreasing cancer mortality, use of additional types of treatment (e.g., X-ray, chemotherapy) after surgery could result in no more than a 5% reduction in the number of deaths from cancer each year2. These considerations emphasize the importance of primary prevention of cancer, which involves the identification of the causes of human cancers.

Keywords

Breast Cancer Cervical Cancer Hepatocellular Carcinoma Bladder Cancer Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© MTP Press Limited 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Montesano
  • D. M. Parkin
  • L. Tomatis

There are no affiliations available

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