Advertisement

Magnetic resonance imaging: applications in psychiatry

  • N. C. Andreasen
  • H. A. Nasrallah
  • J. C. Ehrhardt
  • W. M. Grove
  • S. C. Olson
  • J. A. Coffman
  • J. H. W. Crossett

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a relatively new radiological technique that is especially useful for evaluating brain structure. It offers several major advantages over computerized tomography (CT), the technique that has been most widely used in psychiatry to date and that has provided clear evidence for structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia [1–3]. Unlike CT, MRI does not require the use of ionizing radiation. It permits visualization of the brain in multiple planes including coronal, sagittal, and transverse. It gives impressive gray-white resolution, yielding pictures nearly as anatomically precise as can be seen directly in postmortem brains. It is also highly sensitive to detecting small white matter lesions. It is not subject to bony artifacts and thereby permits excellent visualization of structures in the posterior fossa.

Keywords

Brain Size Brain Electrical Activity Structural Brain Abnormality Cranial Area Cranial Size 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Johnstone, E.C., Crow, TJ, Frith, CD, Husband, J, and Kreel, L (1976). Cerebral ventricular size and cognitive impairment in chronic schizophrenia. Lancet, 2, 925,Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Weinberger, DR, Torrey, EF, Neophytides, AN, and Wyatt, RJ (1979). Lateral cerebral ventricular enlargement in chronic schizophrenia. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 37, 735.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Andreasen, NC, Smith, MR, Jacoby, CG, Dennert, JW, and Olsen, SA (1982). Ventricular enlargement in schizophrenia: Definition and prevalence. Am J Psychiatry, 139, 292.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Fuster, JM (1980). The Prefrontal Cortex. (New York: Raven Press).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Weinberger, DR, Berman, KF, and Zee, RF (1986). Physiological dysfunction of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia: 1. Regional cerebral blood flow evidence. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 43, 114.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Buchsbaum, MS, Ingvar, DH, Kessler, R, Waters, PN, Cappelletti, J, Van Kammen, DP, King, AC, Johnson, JL, Manning, RG, Flynn, RW, Mann, LS, Bunney, WE, and Sokoloff, L (1982). Cerebral glucography with positron tomography: Use in normal subjects and in patients with schizophrenia. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 39, 251.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Morihisa, JM, Duffy, JH, and Wyatt, RJ (1983). Brain electrical activity mapping in schizophrenic patients. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 40, 719.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Benes, FM, Davidson, J, and Bird, ED (1986). Quantitative psychoarchitectural studies of the cerebral cortex in schizophrenics. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 43, 31.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Schulsinger, F, Parnis, J, Peterson, ET, Schulsinger, H, Teasdale, TW, Mednick, SA, Moller, L, and Sil verton, L (1984). Cerebral ventricular size in the offspring of schizophrenic mothers: A preliminary study. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 41, 601.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Brown, R, Colter, N, Corsellis, JAN, Crow, TJ, Frith, CD, Jagoe, R, Johnstone, EC, and Marsh, L (1986). Postmortem evidence of structural brain changes in schizophrenia. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 43, 36PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© MTP Press Limited 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. C. Andreasen
  • H. A. Nasrallah
  • J. C. Ehrhardt
  • W. M. Grove
  • S. C. Olson
  • J. A. Coffman
  • J. H. W. Crossett

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations