Mineral nutrition

  • P. Adams
Chapter
Part of the The Tomato Crop book series (WOCS)

Abstract

Tomatoes will grow moderately well over a range of levels of each nutrient. Manipulation of the nutrient supply is, however, essential in achieving the high yields of good quality fruit needed for profitable production. Whilst nutrient levels must never become less than fully adequate for growth and yield, the level of potassium required for good fruit quality greatly exceeds that needed for maximum yield.

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  • P. Adams

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