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Alphabet Soup Case Study Two: The Codex Committee on Pesticide Residues

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Part of the Environmental Ethics and Science Policy book series (EESP, volume 1)

Abstract

In the post Chernobyl period, awareness of the existence of international standards organizations has increased dramatically. Like the international Red Cross, such organizations are seen to be a source of unbiased and scientific information about public safety. People are reassured when they are told that the radiation in the drinking water conforms to, or exceeds only marginally, the international standard for radiation. Everyone breathes easier if the levels of airborne radiation meet the international standard.

Keywords

Standard Setting Pesticide Residue National Interest World Country Maximum Residue Limit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Secretariat of the Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme, Codex Alimentarius Commission, Codex Alimentarius Commission: Procedural Manual, 5th ed. (Rome: FAO/WHO, 1981), p. 3.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    D. G. Chapman, The Codex Alimentarius Commission: General Overview and Historical Perspective, (unpublished document, not dated), p. 4.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
  4. 4.
    Secretariat of the Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme, Codex Alimentarius Commission, op. cit., p. 21.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Ibid., p. 44.Google Scholar
  6. 7.
  7. 8.
    Kenneth C. Walker, “International Aspects of Pesticides,” Industrial Production and Formulation of Pesticides in Developing Countries, Vol 1: General Principles and Formulation of Pesticides, United Nations Industrial Development Organization, (New York: United Nations, 1972), p. 20.Google Scholar
  8. 9.
    Ibid., pp. 26–27.Google Scholar
  9. 11.
    Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme, Codex Alimentarius Commission, Report of the Seventeenth Session of the Codex Committee on Pesticide Residues, (Rome: FAO/WHO, 1986).Google Scholar
  10. 12.
    Memorandum to: Codex Contact Points — Participants in the 13th Session of CCPR, from: J. M. Stalker, Associate Director, Technical Services Section, Pesticides Division.Google Scholar
  11. 16.
    Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme, Codex Alimentarius Commission, Report of the Tenth Session of the Codex Committee on Pesticide Residues, (Rome: FAO/WHO), 1986.Google Scholar
  12. 17.
    Working paper of the Joint Management Committee on Pesticide Residues (JMPR), 1978.Google Scholar
  13. 19.
    See, for example: Reconsideration of Codex Definition of Terms in Light of Definitions Adapted by the Joint FAO/WHO Meeting on Pesticide Residues, paper prepared by the Secretariat, (CX/PR 80/21, April 1980). See also: U.S. Comments to the Ad Hoc Working Group on Regulatory Analysis, (not dated).Google Scholar
  14. 20.
    Pesticide Residues in Food: Report of the 1983 Joint FAOIWHO Meeting of Experts, op. cit., p. 5.Google Scholar
  15. 21.
    Codex Alimentarius, Volume XIII: Codex Maximum Limits for Pesticide Residues, (Rome: FAO/WHO, CAC/VOL XIII — Ed 1, 1983), p. 7-iv.Google Scholar
  16. 23.
    See: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, The OECD and its Chemicals Programme, August, 1983, (W7299A).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of CommunicationSimon Fraser UniversityCanada

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