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Global Climatic Changes and Geopolitics: Pressures on Developed and Developing Countries

  • Peter H. Gleick
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASIC, volume 285)

Abstract

Large-scale climatic changes may lead to international frictions and resource competition between both developed and developing countries for three principal reasons: the major responsibility for the production of greenhouse gases lies with the industrialized countries; the socioeconomic and environmental impacts of climatic changes will be far more equally distributed; and there are major differences in the ability of countries to respond or adapt to climatic impacts. These inequities may complicate the possibility of negotiating international agreements to prevent or slow the greenhouse effect. This paper discusses these three issues, the principal vulnerabilities of both developed countries and developing countries to climatic changes, and mechanisms for improving international cooperation.

Keywords

Climatic Change Future Climatic Change Climatic Impact United Nations Environment Programme Freshwater Resource 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter H. Gleick
    • 1
  1. 1.Energy and Resources GroupUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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